Archive for early literacy

August 6 storytime: fish and friends

We visited our friends in the ocean today at storytime. Our early literacy skill of the day was phonological awareness.

Songs and fingerplays: (see song page for more information)

storytime song, open shut them, the fish in the sea, chomp chomp oh no!, head shoulders knees and toes, 5 little fishes swimming in the sea, alphabet song, Simon Says

Activities:

shark goes chomp!

Books:

Fish Wish

Ten Little Fish

Literacy info to adults:

aside #1: The early literacy skill we’ll look at today is Phonological Awareness. This means being able to hear and play with the smaller sounds in words—like hearing rhyming words, and being able to clap syllables or parts of words. Researchers know this is an important skill for later when your child begins to sound out words.

aside #2: linger over words when you read out loud, and have your child repeat words with fun sounds with you after you read them. And be sure to choose picture books that you can have fun reading out loud and sharing spoken language with your child.

aside #3: Books with rhyming text will help your child hear the sounds in words, which will build their phonological awareness skills. So when you choose books to read to your child, try to find some with rhyming text.

Lane Library book information:

Fish Wish

Ten Little Fish

Comments (1)

June 25th storytime: hippity hop, little bunnies

We hip hopped our way through storytime today, as we read and sang about rabbits.   Our early literacy skill of the day was print awareness.

Songs and fingerplays: (see song page for more information)

storytime song, open shut them, my ears are starting to wiggle, do your ears hang low, eency weency spider (songboard), alphabet song, Simon Says

Activities:

rhyming activity with -unny, little bunny little bunny

Books:

Bunny Fun

Overboard

Literacy info to adults:

aside #1: We talked about the early literacy skill print awareness, which is an awareness of how books work. I explained that print awareness is how we know that we read the words on the page, not the pictures, and we read from front and back, top and bottom, left to right

aside #2: Choosing books that have interesting or larger type helps develop your child’s print awareness.

aside #3:  I explained that I pointed to some of the words in the book, the ones with larger type, as I read them. This helps children understand that it is the words we are reading, which develops print awareness.

Lane Library book information

Bunny Fun

Overboard!

Leave a Comment

June 18th storytime: Gettin' Buggy

Eek!  We got buggy with it today at storytime, as we read and sang about bugs.   Our early literacy skill of the day was vocabulary.

Songs and fingerplays: (see song page for more information)

storytime song, open shut them, a hunting we will go, creepy crawly caterpillar, spider on the floor, here is the beehive, alphabet song, Simon Says

Activities:

butterfly butterfly

Books:

I Love Bugs

Spider on the Floor

Literacy info to adults:

aside #1: We talked about the early literacy skill vocabulary, which is knowing the specific names for objects and concepts

aside #2: Having a large vocabulary, knowing the names of things, is one of the skills children need when they later learn to sound out words.  Books give us different words that those we use in conversation or that are on television, so choose a wide variety of books to read to your child.

aside #3:  Prompting children to act out the meaning of words provides them with a fun and active way to learn new words and to practice their vocabulary skills (like pointing out objects and body parts during the reading and singing of Spider on the Floor)

Lane Library book information

I Love Bugs

Spider on the Floor

Leave a Comment

fun with…music for the whole family

Kids love music.   And often they love to sing, move and dance to the music they hear (or even sometimes make themselves!)

Research has proven that listening to and participating with music is beneficial to kids in many ways, especially in the development of language and literacy skills.   For example, how did most people likely learn their ABC’s?   Almost certainly, we learned them by singing that oh so familiar song.  Combining music with information stimulates the brain and makes that information easier to remember.

A child’s instinctive ability to listen and decode a song extends to reading.  Just as they have sung along with a familiar song, so they will read along in a familiar book.  The sense of rhythm obtained from listening to music will also help young readers to identify patterns, like rhyming words, which will help them learn to read.  Because songs automatically break down words into smaller sounds through tones, singing particularly helps to develop the early literacy skill phonological awareness.

While the traditional songs of Raffi and Pete Seeger are almost always a popular choice with kids, there are many wonderful cd’s at Lane that will entertain the whole family.  Be sure to check them out!

You Are My Little Bird — Elizabeth Mitchell  Lane Library info

Ralph’s Word: Happy Lemons — Ralph Covert  Lane Library info

Bloom — Zak Morgan  Lane Library info

Jim Gill Makes It Noisy in Boise, Idaho — Jim Gill  Lane Library info

No! — They Might Be Giants  Lane Library info

Peter, Paul and Mommy — Peter, Paul and Mary  Lane Library info

Family Dance — Dan Zanes  Lane Library info

Snacktime! — Barenaked Ladies  Lane Library info

Leave a Comment

June 11 storytime: big and little

Who’s big? Who’s little? We found out today in storytime!  Our early literacy skill of the day was phonological awareness.

Songs and fingerplays: (see song page for more information)

storytime song, open shut them, itsy bitsy/great big hairy/teency weency spider, little fish/big fish in the water, songboard, alphabet song, Simon Says

Activities:

look at big and little animal pictures and discuss, big and little names, dance with scarves (dance big to Choo Choo Train, dance small to Take a Little Nap from the cd Ralph’s World, see cd info below)

Books:

One Day in the Jungle

I’m the Biggest Thing in the Ocean

Literacy info to adults:

#1: We talked about the early literacy skill phonological awareness, which is the ability to hear and manipulate the smaller sounds in words

#2: Make up silly words by changing the first sound in a word: milk, nilk, pilk, rilk, filk.  It’s OK if the words are nonsense words, you just want to demonstrate how sounds can be manipulated

#3:  Play with and help your child hear the syllables in words.  For example, say words with a pause between the syllables (rab it) and have your child guess what word you are saying.

Lane Library book and cd information

One Day in the Jungle

I’m the Biggest Thing in the Ocean

Ralph’s World

Leave a Comment

May 21st storytime: let's dance

We got to show off our fancy moves today, because storytime was all about dancing!  Our early literacy skill of the day was phonological awareness.

Songs and fingerplays: (see song page for more information)

storytime song, open shut them, if you like to dance clap your hands, stretch/head shoulders knees and toes, hokey pokey, Tommy thumb, dance your fingers, Simon Says

Activities:

dance our body parts to music (Twist on All Time Favorite Dances),  feather dance to music (Shake Your Body on Sugar Beats Greatest Dance Hits), ring bells to the syllables in kids’ names

Books:

Baby Danced the Polka

Hilda Must Be Dancing (we clapped on and repeated the fun dancing words in this book)

Asides:

#1: We talked about the early literacy skill phonological awareness, which is the ability to hear and play with the smaller sounds in words

#2: hearing words that rhyme will help your child break down words into smaller parts, so books with lots of rhymes are a great choice to help develop this skill

#3: Anything with a great rhythm is good for developing phonological awareness, and clapping on each syllable helps kids break up words into their smaller sounds

We had a good time dancing!

Lane Library book information

Baby Danced the Polka

Hilda Must Be Dancing

Leave a Comment

early literacy at home–puppets

Adding  puppet play to the reading of your child’s favorite books will increase their enjoyment of the books and help your child make connections to the stories.   You don’t even have to purchase the puppets–puppet making can be a fun and easy activity to do with your child at home.

You can make puppets out of small paper lunch bags.  Use whatever materials you have on hand to decorate the paper bags.  You can attach stickers and glue on feathers, paper scraps, fabric, buttons, googly eyes, sequins, gift wrap–whatever your imagination and craft drawers yield.  Just be sure to keep safety in mind as you make your choices.   Remember too that the bottom flap of the bag will the head and mouth of the paper bag puppet so decorate accordingly.  Once your puppets are decorated, show your child how to stick the bag on their hand and how to make the puppet talk (by moving the bottom flap with your hand inside the bag).

Craft sticks (also known as popsicle sticks or tongue depressors) can also be used, along with paper plate or construction paper shapes.  Just decorate the shape with crayons or markers, or design and color a puppet on the paper plate.  You can cut the plate in half to make it easier for your child to handle.    You can even glue on yarn for hair, and wiggly eyes.  Then use strong tape to attach the shape to the craft stick.  Voila, a puppet!

Have fun acting out your favorite books with puppets!

Leave a Comment

Older Posts »