Archive for May, 2009

no toddler time storytime on May 28th

Because of the Memorial Day holiday week, there will be no storytime on May 27th.  But we start right back up in June (can you believe that next week is JUNE?!)  All summer storytimes at the Hamilton branch will be on the same days and times that they were during the spring.  Toddler Time will continue to be on Thursdays at 11am.

We will have many fun and exciting programs this summer for kids up to 12 years old, so be sure to check out our summer schedule and come visit us at the library!

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May 21st storytime: let's dance

We got to show off our fancy moves today, because storytime was all about dancing!  Our early literacy skill of the day was phonological awareness.

Songs and fingerplays: (see song page for more information)

storytime song, open shut them, if you like to dance clap your hands, stretch/head shoulders knees and toes, hokey pokey, Tommy thumb, dance your fingers, Simon Says

Activities:

dance our body parts to music (Twist on All Time Favorite Dances),  feather dance to music (Shake Your Body on Sugar Beats Greatest Dance Hits), ring bells to the syllables in kids’ names

Books:

Baby Danced the Polka

Hilda Must Be Dancing (we clapped on and repeated the fun dancing words in this book)

Asides:

#1: We talked about the early literacy skill phonological awareness, which is the ability to hear and play with the smaller sounds in words

#2: hearing words that rhyme will help your child break down words into smaller parts, so books with lots of rhymes are a great choice to help develop this skill

#3: Anything with a great rhythm is good for developing phonological awareness, and clapping on each syllable helps kids break up words into their smaller sounds

We had a good time dancing!

Lane Library book information

Baby Danced the Polka

Hilda Must Be Dancing

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early literacy at home–puppets

Adding  puppet play to the reading of your child’s favorite books will increase their enjoyment of the books and help your child make connections to the stories.   You don’t even have to purchase the puppets–puppet making can be a fun and easy activity to do with your child at home.

You can make puppets out of small paper lunch bags.  Use whatever materials you have on hand to decorate the paper bags.  You can attach stickers and glue on feathers, paper scraps, fabric, buttons, googly eyes, sequins, gift wrap–whatever your imagination and craft drawers yield.  Just be sure to keep safety in mind as you make your choices.   Remember too that the bottom flap of the bag will the head and mouth of the paper bag puppet so decorate accordingly.  Once your puppets are decorated, show your child how to stick the bag on their hand and how to make the puppet talk (by moving the bottom flap with your hand inside the bag).

Craft sticks (also known as popsicle sticks or tongue depressors) can also be used, along with paper plate or construction paper shapes.  Just decorate the shape with crayons or markers, or design and color a puppet on the paper plate.  You can cut the plate in half to make it easier for your child to handle.    You can even glue on yarn for hair, and wiggly eyes.  Then use strong tape to attach the shape to the craft stick.  Voila, a puppet!

Have fun acting out your favorite books with puppets!

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May 7th storytime: cats, cats, cats!

We got our meows on at story time this week, as we read stories and sang songs about cats. Our early literacy skill of the day was vocabulary.

Songs and fingerplays: (see song page for more information)

storytime song, open shut them,wheels on the bus, have you ever seen a cat go this way and that, I’ve got a cat on my knee, 5 little kittens, there’s a cat in my little red wagon, big A little A, where is big (little) cat, Simon Says

Activities:

pet, look at, and describe cat puppets, ring bells when they saw a picture of a cat in Feathers For Lunch (after discussing the word c-a-t)

Books:

Cookie’s Week

Feathers For Lunch

Black Cat White Cat

Asides:

#1: I told the adults about the early skill vocabulary, which means knowing the names of things, having words to describe things, and knowing that there are various words for the same object

#2: adding activities or songs that mesh well with a book will increase your child’s enjoyment and retention of the new vocabulary

#3: learning about concepts such as opposites can be a great way to help children develop vocabulary about things that are real but can’t be seen (includes concepts such as opposites)

We had a good time snoring at the library!

Lane Library book information

Cookie’s Week

Feathers For Lunch

Black Cat White Cat

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April 30 storytime: go to sleep

We snored at storytime today–not out of boredom but because storytime was all about that most unpopular of times, bedtime!   Our early literacy skill  of the day was print awareness.

Songs and fingerplays: (see song page for more information)

storytime song, open shut them, twinkle twinkle little star, this is the way we _____ before we go to bed, if you’re a big dinosaur, 3 little monkeys jumping on the bed, head shoulders knees and toes, teddy bear teddy bear, 7 in the bed, Simon Says

Activities:

teddy bear hunt

Books:

Dinosaur vs Bedtime (used a sign that said “ROAR”, which I occasionally held up while reading the book, when they saw the sign the kids were to roar)

Where’s My Teddy (big book)

Don’t Let the Pigeon Stay Up Late (used a sign that said “NO”, which I occasionally held up while reading the book, when they saw the sign the kids were to say no)

Asides:

#1: I told the adults about print awareness, and how that means that their child notices print, knows how to handle a book and can follow the written word on a page.

#2: When you read aloud with your children, they gradually become aware that the squiggles on the page mean something. Children will also begin to notice print in the world around them. It helps to point out signs as you drive or shop, like stop signs.

#3 would have been: You may have noticed that I ran my finger under the word no each time we said that word. This helps develop your children’s print awareness, knowing that print has meaning and that it is the words we read and not the pictures. Choosing books that have large or varied fonts is also helpful in the development of print awareness

(the kids were ready for storytime to be over at this point, so we skipped the aside and went right to the end of storytime).

We had a good time snoring at the library!

Lane Library book information:

Dinosaur vs Bedtime

Where’s My Teddy

Don’t Let the Pigeon Stay Up Late

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