Archive for October, 2006

web review

Happy Halloween!

For some great Halloween ideas, try Kaboose’s Halloween page.  Here you’ll find a list of kid friendly Halloween movies, advice on how to stay safe, “haunted” recipes, costume suggestions, fun crafts, and more ideas for a deliciously spooky (and family friendly) Halloween.

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poetry Friday

The Sweet and Sour Animal Book by Langston Hughes

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Short and simple poems about animals cover each letter of the alphabet in this visually stunning book.   Younger kids will enjoy the rhythmic verse, while beginning readers will love being able to read the poems themselves.   And what a fun way to read about animals, old and new.  The illustrations were done by students from the Harlem School of the Arts, and are brightly colored and visually arresting, set against a plain background of either black or white.  This is a fun book full of poetry and color, an enjoyable read for all ages.

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book review

Under the Bed! by David Wood and Richard Fowler

UNDER THE BED

A story your kids are sure to find funny!  Little Bear tells his dad that there is a monster under the bed, and even describes the monster in great detail.  Dad, of course, insists that there is not a monster under Little Bear’s bed.  And he’s right!  But so is Little Bear.  A great surprise on the last page will have your kids asking for this one over and over. 

The story is short and simple.  The illustrations are evocative of night, with muted, chalky colors on a dark background.  And of course, the surprise on the last page is both funny and an effective way to give this story an ending to remember.

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poetry Friday

I missed poetry Friday last week!  But we’ll just make today poetry Monday instead.

Candy Corn by James Stevenson

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These poems show the imagination that can exist in the every day.  Dumpsters, frogs, old buildings and other mundane objects become more in the words of James Stevenson.  These poems are short and simple, yet still lyrical, and are perfect for the younger reader, who will recognize his or her world on these pages.  Give Candy Corn a try, the experience might be as sweet as the candy.  And don’t forget, the poetry experience can be a bridge between listening and reading.  What a great reason to give poetry a chance.

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book review

Ouch! By Ragnhild Scamell

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Hedgehog is ready to settle in to her nest for a long winter’s nap, when plop! a problem occurs, in the shape of an apple landing on her back and getting stuck on her quills.  With this unwanted new addition to her wardrobe, Hedgehog can no longer fit into her nest.  What’s a Hedgehog to do?  Ask her friends, of course, but Hedgehog and her friends have no luck at all.  In fact, they only manage to add to the apple, in the form of brown nuts, a small green pear, a crumpled leaf, a pink water lily, and more.   It’s only when she meets Goat does hedgehog find a solution to her problem.  This is a fun story, and kids will love to laugh (gently of course) at Hedgehog’s difficulties in removing the objects from her back.  The childlike illustrations perfectly fit the story, especially when Hedgehog’s “legs paddled in the air as she twisted and wriggled and rolled”, and the animals are simply adorable.  What a fun story!

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ideas for storytime fun at home

I”ll miss you all in storytime this week (no storytime until October 26). But I have some great ideas for you to have your own storytime fun at home. First, decide whether you want a storytime about bugs, or one that will get you in the spirit for Halloween. Or do both!

Then, go to the Lane Library Kids Page, scroll down to the TumbleBooks option and click on the blue box. Then choose the storybooks option–it’s the red oval on the left. If you would like to do a bugs storytime, click on B-C and scroll down to the book Bugs Bugs Bugs. Click on the View Online button on the left, and listen and watch as the book is read to you right on the computer.  When you’re done with the book, try singing a song about bugs. How about “eency weency spider”? Try singing it normally at first, then faster and faster. See how fast you can sing the song and still do the motions!

If you would like to get in the Halloween spirit, TumbleBooks has three great options. You can choose F-H and then find Frank Was A Monster Who Wanted To Dance, or go to J-M and pick Lima Bean Monster, or click on L-M and scroll all the way down for Monster Mash. Once you’ve listened to the book, you’ll be in the mood for some spooky music. Try one song or them all on KIDiddles spooky music page.

Although we can’t have show and tell together at the library this week, you can do a letter of the day show and tell at home. Why not make it H day, and help your child find things around the house that start with H? Maybe you’ll find a horse, or a hat, or a Halloween mask, or even a happy face. And here are some H coloring sheets you can print out for more H practice.

Have a happy week and I will see you on October 26th for a real library storytime!

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book review

Leonardo the Terrible Monster by Mo Willems

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Simple text and illustrations help tell this story, in which the reader finds that things are not always what they seem.  Monsters are not always scary, and kids who cry are not always scaredy cats.  Take Leonardo and Sam, for example.  Leonardo is a monster who can not scare people–he is too small, doesn’t have enough teeth, and isn’t weird enough.  But he is determined, as he practices his scare technicques and finally looks through piles of books to find a kid he can scare.  He finds Sam, and appears to have scared him, and Sam begins to cry.  But Sam is not the scaredy cat he seems.  Instead, the reader finds out that Sam is a frustrated kid with lots of problems, and a tummy ache, too.  And that’s when Leonardo and Sam once again do the unexpected–they become friends.  A funny tale that demonstrates to kids the importance of determination, understanding, and friendship.

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